Dialogue, Writing, Writing Resources

Dazzling Dialogue—Part IV

Conflict in scenes and tension between characters you’ve heard of before in writing. This time, we’ll talk about conflict in dialogue. Dialogue is the greatest way to portray conflict and tension in scenes and between characters. Argument and disagreements between even friends and allies helps to create sparkling dialogue. Click to Tweet #dazzlingdialogue #amwriting

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Dialogue, Writing, Writing Emotion, Writing Resources

Dazzling Dialogue––Part I

Dialogue is important in every story, because the reader wants to know what the character says, and how they’ll say it. I’ve not spent too much time on dialogue before, so I want to focus in on it, now. I’ve been told I’m pretty good at it, but I know I have room for improvement. To know the character is know how that character speaks. Click to Tweet #dazzlingdialogue #amwriting

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Plotting, Writing, Writing Ideas, Writing Resources

Plot Patterns—Part I

plot-structureToday I’ll be using two resources to talk about plot patterns. One is James Scott Bell’s Plot & Structure. The other is DiAnn Mills’ Dance of Character & Plot. I’m using both, because even though what they say is similar, the way they say is different. Both perspectives can broaden your understanding of plotting. Click to Tweet #Plotpatterns #Plotting

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Breakout Workbook, building characters, Donald Maas, Writing

Writing–The Mystery of Characters Part I

sheriff characterWhat is a character? An imaginary person we writers think up. How did I create Meghan Gallagher? She started out as a nineteen-year-old very unlikeable spoiled brat, which is what I wanted her to be, but soon learned no one wants to read about a spoiled brat, even though she was going to change drastically. A former Christian Writers Guild (CWG) mentor helped me make her more likeable, and it worked. Meghan could still exhibit immaturity and impulsiveness, but without the entitlement snobby attitudes that go with it.

How did I form her two suitors, Scott and Duncan? Well, they had to be similar, yet very different. Duncan the cowboy especially, had to be opposite of Meghan, yet in reality, had more in common with her than Scott, the doctor. I’ll deal with them in Part II, and some of my supporting characters in Part III. Continue reading “Writing–The Mystery of Characters Part I”

Writing, Writing Resources

Plots That Dance – Part I

by DiAnn Mills
by DiAnn Mills

I spotlighted this book, The Dance of Character & Plot, a few months ago in an interview with my Craftsman mentor, DiAnn Mills. You can check out that interview here. Now, I’m going to shine that spotlight on one part of the book, Chapter Seven.

Here’s her opening statement: “We all want our novels to dance. Our characters are authentic, fascinating, and irresistible. We’ve researched our setting so thoroughly, we know the area inch by inch. But if our novel lacks a substantial plot, our story will never receive an invitation to join the dance of a publisher’s list of new releases.”

What makes up a good plot? Let’s look at it.

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