Plunging the Depths of Deep POV –– Part V

from Flickr

from Flickr

Last time look at the interior life of the viewpoint character, their thoughts, attitudes, reactions, and emotions. Deep POV enhances the reader’s experience with your story. Click to Tweet #amwriting #DeepPOV

This time, we’ll begin a series of examples, before and after, to show you the differences, and how text comes alive.

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Plunging the Depths of Deep POV –– Part IV

from Flickr

from Flickr

We’re discussing Deep POV, and how to get inside the character’s head to make the experience more impactful for the reader. Last time, we listed basic writing tips for deep POV. Only visceral reactions by the viewpoint character count for building deep POV. Click to Tweet #amwriting #DeepPOV

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Plunging the Depths of Deep POV –– Part III

from Flickr

from Flickr

It’s all the rage with publishers and writers these days.

Why do publishers want you to write in Deep POV? The reader gets into the head of the viewpoint character in a rewarding and intimate way with Deep POV. Click to Tweet #amwriting #DeepPOV

It used to be that most POVs were acceptable, as long as they were consistent. That’s changed with the advent of Deep POV.

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Creating Extraordinary Characters––Wrap-Up

Melanie Wilkes-2  rabb Messala and Judah

It’s been a L-O-N-G series, but I wanted to especially focus in on different tools you can use to identify your characters’ personality types, by looking at least a couple different tools. I won’t get into the four types of Personality Plus; you can look those up yourself. They were created by Florence Littauer, especially to help the common person understand why there are the way they are. #amwriting #characters

Today, I’m wrapping this series up with an encouragement to delve into personality types, characteristics, emotions, conflict, and motivations.

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Creating Extraordinary Characters –– Part VIII

demystified sawyerWe’ve been looking at different tools to help build character natures, dispositions, and temperament. Another is Conflict. Using conflict within your characters will create extraordinary situations, responses, and ultimately, characters. Click to Tweet #amwriting #characters

In his book, Fiction Writing Demystified, Tom Sawyer (yes, that’s his real name), says that using and focusing on conflict in your characters will make them tell their story.

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