Tag Archive | scenes

Writing Scintillating Scenes––Part VI

This time, we’ll look at tension and conflict from a different perspective, an uncommon and sometimes unconscious way of looking at it. We do it in our everyday lives, and it has the potential of creating peace or conflict––negotiation. Click to Tweet #amwriting #scintillatingscenes

It is understood that conflict is at the heart of out stories. It drives the action, forces character change, and keeps things interesting. But what if we thought about tension from a different perspective?

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Writing Scintillating Scenes––Part II

Last week, we learned that a scene is and has––action. Action is what happens. Every scene should have an impactful event that occurs during it. As the story progresses, each scene adds its contribution to the overall tale, to make an event. Scene events don’t always need to be spectacular, but must be meaningful and interesting, moving the story along. Click to Tweet #amwriting #scintillatingscenes Continue reading

Writing Scintillating Scenes––Part I

I read somewhere that scenes are the “guts” of your novel. They are powerful and intense, they engage readers and help them to keep on reading. What is a scene? It is the most vivid and immediate part of the story, emotionally involved, their minds are filled with images and memories of actions. Click to Tweet #amwriting #scintillatingscenes

Simply put, a scene is action! Scenes are text passages, including narrative, meant to focus on an event in the story, sometimes slowing it down, so that the reader is “in the moment.” The readers join in the scene along with the characters in action.

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Seamless Self-Editing—Part I

scenebookYou hear it more and more these days. Your manuscript must be “publish-ready” in order for it to be considered. Click to Tweet What does “publish-ready” mean? #amwriting #publish-ready #self-editing

For the next few blog posts, we’ll look at this and how you can improve your raw writing into something closer to “publish-ready.” I’ll be using several resources for this. Today’s resource is The Scene Book, by Sandra Scofield.

First, let’s take a look at what it means. Continue reading

Show vs. Tell — Part I

Self Editing for Fiction Writers

Self Editing for Fiction Writers

Self-Editing for Fiction Writers
By Renni Browne & Dave King
Second Edition

I was recently in a small group of writers and we were discussing show and tell. Or should I say show vs. tell. The old way of writing was tell, describe, narrate. The new way of writing is scenes, show, illustrate with words. Show, don’t tell. Why? Click to Tweet #amwriting #showvtell #selfediting

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Putting Fire in Your Fiction

The Fire in FictionThe tagline to Donald Maas’ The Fire in Fiction is “passion, purpose, and techniques TO MAKE YOUR NOVEL GREAT.”

The book covers everything from characterization, the story world, scenes, dialogue, and voice. Each chapter has a set of practical tools dealing with each section from that chapter. As an example, I’ll talk about Chapter Three, Scenes That Can’t Be Cut.

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Writing Resource – The Scene Book

scenebook

One of my former Christian Writer’s Guild mentors is named Sandra, but she is the not same Sandra Scofield who wrote The Scene Book, A Primer for the Fiction Writer. My Sandra recommended it to me to help me craft scenes better. I haven’t read all of it yet, but I will be. The book offers examples and information on how to construct scenes in your novel. Every chapter has exercises to help you incorporate what you’ve learned into what you’re writing.

Let’s look at it.

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